The Association for Science Education

ASE Annual Conference 2015 - University of Reading

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Science Opens Doors: Careers from Science - T19

Thursday 8th January 2015

10:30 - 11:30

Location : Chemistry, LTG

Speakers

  1. Clive Thompson CBE - The Horners' Company
  2. Dr Barry Maunders/ Dr Michael O'Brien - The Horners' Company

Classroom science is fun, but does not link to what scientists DO. Science Opens Doors brings together 9-10 year olds in the classroom to do simple science investigations and give them information about science based careers. The project is based upon the KCL ASPIRES Work, and Science Council studies highlighting that of 6 million jobs needing science qualifications in UK only 20% are as pure scientists the 80% have valuable jobs throughout the economy.5 participating London schools to date.

Science Resources for Global Learning - W07

Thursday 8th January 2015

10:30 - 11:30

Location : Palmer, 103

Speakers

  1. Marianne Cutler - ASE
  2. Helen Harden - ASE

This session focuses on how science supports achieving the Millennium Development Goals, which we illustrate with new and popular older teaching resources (for students aged 7-11 and 11-14 years) from ASE and partners. This session is part of the Global Learning project, which is funded by the Department for International Development.

STEM Study Visits: Expedition Iceland - T18

Thursday 8th January 2015

10:30 - 11:30

Location : HumSS, 125

Speakers

  1. Wayne Jarvis - Science Learning Centre Central Consortia

Every year the network of Science Learning Centres run a STEM study visit to Iceland. The aim is to provide participants with the opportunity to conduct a STEM subject field work project in a remote environment and experience a different approach to practical activities. The visit also provides experience of an area of the natural world which has recently been at the centre of a number of STEM relevant stories. From earthquakes to Mars training, Iceland is a destination that can bring STEM subjects to life in the classroom! Discover the wide variety of field projects teachers carry out on the expedition, and find out the impact it has for themselves and the schools they teach at.

Identification of GMOs using PCR - W05

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:00 - 12:30

Location : Exhibition Marquee, A110

For centuries, man has used selective breeding and conventional hybridization to produce desirable qualities and to increase crop yields.Today, scientists use genetic engineering to directly manipulate the DNA, quickly producing these desirable traits. Due to controversy, some companies have decided to remove GMOs from their foods. In this workshop, snack food DNA is extracted and analyzed using the PCR and Gel Electrophoresis.

Better Practicals, Better Learning: Improve your Skills (Hands-On!) (Repeated) - D01

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:00 - 13:00

Location : AMS, Lab G11

Speakers

  1. Matt Endean - CLEAPSS
  2. Harriet Truscott - Science and Plants for Schools (SAPS)

A chance to get hands-on and try out new and interesting practical activities covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Many of these are based on the reduced scale principle. Also you can make your own equipment which you get to take back to school with you.

Think Physics: Using Physics to Inspire Young People - T22

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:00 - 12:00

Location : Henley, 101

Speakers

  1. Dr Carol Davenport - Think Physics @ Northumbria University

Think Physics is an innovative, cradle-to-career project aimed at using physics to inspire young people, particularly women, into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. The project is led by Northumbria University in North East England. In this session, you will find out about some of the activities that Think Physics is using to inspire children from primary to post-16, and how we are supporting parents and teachers. You will also take away some great ideas that you can use in your classroom.

BERG - Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning in Biology Education: enabling and empowering the self-regulated learner - T23

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:15 - 12:00

Location : Palmer, 108

Speakers

  1. Dr Liz Lakin - College of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Dundee

This talk reports on successful practice in biology and environmental science, presenting research-based recommendations for transforming and extending inquiry-based teaching and learning.

Recording Science Assessment - T24

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:30 - 12:30

Location : HumSS, 27 LT

Speakers

  1. Chris Smith - Essex Education Services -Target Tracker
  2. Chris Haines - Essex Education Services-Education Consultancy

Developed within Essex Education Services for Target Tracker, the Primary Target Tracker is an elegant all-in-one assessment tool specifically designed to be a user friendly and intuitive assessment recording methodology. The simple click and re-click system allows quick and easy assessment of individuals or classes within science and across the whole curriculum. Delegates will gain insight into the system and a case study provided by a current user will give evidence of the impact on assessment in her school

Addressing the Energy Challenge: The Role of Chemistry - T26

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:30 - 12:30

Location : Henley, G10

Speakers

  1. Dr Paz Vaqueiro - School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading

Declining fossil fuel reserves and climate change arising from increased CO2 emissions pose an enormous challenge to society. The development of alternative energy generation techniques offers the only realistic hope for a long-term solution, and chemistry is at the forefront of many of these advances. This lecture will provide an overview of the contribution of chemical sciences to the development of new energy technologies, from hydrogen storage to thermoelectric power generation.

Impacts of Prehistoric People on the Climate System - T28

Thursday 8th January 2015

11:30 - 12:30

Location : Henley, G15

Speakers

  1. Dr Joy Singarayer - Department of Meteorology, University of Reading

There is little question that humans have been driving climate and environmental change since the industrial revolution. But did earlier humans have a measurable impact on the climate system? And do we still see the effects of a prehistoric legacy today? This lecture explores ideas that prehistoric populations altered large-scale ecosystems and climate, including the impacts of extinctions of megafauna such as mammoths and woolly rhinos that were, in part, caused by hunter-gatherers, and the spread of agriculture.

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