The Association for Science Education

ASE Annual Conference 2017 - University of Reading

The HiSPARC project - W09

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 13:00

Location : Palmer, 101

Speakers

  1. University of Birmingham - Maria Pavlidou
  2. University of Birmingham

This session presents the international project HiSPARC to study high-energy cosmic rays in schools. Try the software analysis tools to identify and measure cosmic rays showers and their energy and provenience, and see how real research can inspire students and give insights into "how science works". Also see practical demonstrations about particle detectors.

Contact email for web/handbook : c.lazzeroni@bham.ac.uk

Shaping participation in science - S03

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : Palmer, 109

Speakers

  1. Kings' College London

Professor Archer will share insights from the Aspires2 and enterprising science projects on the factors that shape young people's participation in science.

Meet the GCSE PAGs REPEATED - W08

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : AMS, G6

Speakers

  1. OCR - Crawford Kingsnorth
  2. OCR - David Paterson
  3. OCR

Hands-on practical workshop for all GCSE science teachers, trying out some practical activities developed by OCR. The workshop will include top tips for embedding activities into a scheme of work, and maximising the teaching and learning opportunities for each activity.

Contact email for web/handbook : www.ocr.org.uk/science

Models & misconceptions - W11

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : AMS, G8

Speakers

  1. Eaton Bank Academy

The session will look at how to identify and address some common misconceptions in chemistry. Having identified the misconceptions we will then use models to help students overcome them. The session will involve some hands on activities and will provide you with ideas to incorporate into your own classroom practice.

Contact email for web/handbook : s.longshaw@eatonbank.org

The language of mathematics in science: an FE perspective - W33

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : Palmer, 103

Speakers

  1. ASE

The ASE's Language of Mathematics in Science project produced guidance on developing common language and procedures in science and mathematics lessons at 11-16. The outcomes of this project have implications for using mathematical skills in post 16 science teaching.

Qualification reform; a two-way conversation - T14

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : Palmer, 102

Speakers

  1. Ofqual

In brief, I will share information about the reforms to GCSEs and A levels, with particular emphasis on the changes to practical science at GCSE, science awarding and the A level practical endorsement. I should also be able to share some of the emerging insight from our research into the impact of the A level practical changes, although this is TBC. I´┐Żll share some resources we have prepared for teachers to use in schools. The session will have plenty of opportunities for colleagues to feed back how the reforms are affecting them and their students.

Frontier Science: How does multilingualism reshape the brain? - T13

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : Henley Business School, G11

Speakers

  1. School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading

Recent evidence has suggested that speaking more than one languages affects the structure of the brain, especially in brain areas that are related to linguistic processing, as well as areas that control and monitor the selection among several languages in bi-/multilinguals. This talk will provide an overview of the available literature on the effects of bi-/multilingualism on brain structure, and will discuss how these effects may be related to non-linguistic cognitive functions, including the proposed "bilingual cognitive advantage". The role of experience-based factors (e.g. mode and onset of additional language learning, amount of linguistic immersion etc.) will also be discussed.

BERG: An approach to learning A level biology - T15

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:00 - 12:00

Location : Carrington, 201

This presentation will provide an overview of a project to produce resources designed to help pupils develop their understanding of A level biology through a programme of directed independent learning and investigative practical work. The presentation will include a review of the approaches taken in the programme and outcomes.

The latest developments in microchemistry REPEATED - T16

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:30 - 12:30

Location : HumSS, Van Emden LT

Speakers

  1. CLEAPSS

Microscale chemistry: Low cost and quickly performed procedures to enhance students'chemistry experience in all parts of chemical education and add variety to your lessons. In the past I have shown visitors to ASE, Microscale chemistry techniques gathered from all around the world. These techniques are usually associated with providing hands-on experience for students starting chemistry education or learning the subject in schools with no laboratory facilities. Teachers often think it has no place in more advanced courses. In this talk with demonstrations, we can apply these simple techniques to challenge students' misunderstandings in how invisible particles interact with water molecules and each other. Chemistry is not magic! It is now easy to show on the bench that molten salts do conduct an electric current. A number of teachers both here and in the States have incorporated the procedures into a seamless lesson of theory, practical and inquiry.I will show you more advanced chemistry uses by preparing and investigating the reactions of "exotic" gaseous alkenes (e.g. propene). This procedure (a useful alternative to smelly cyclohexene) uses a novel technique with 3-way taps and syringes to collect gases initially collected over water. Also I will hydrogenate propene to propane. The phenomenon of paramagnetism in transition metal can be very rapidly shown in precipitates and complexes formed in droplets. Thin layer chromatography is really quick and easy at the micro level. Micro-titrations need not be acid/base, they can cover redox and complexometric reactions as well.By using webcams, USB microscopes or even your mobile phone, teachers and students can make videos for "flipping"or revision. The procedures are often so quick that they can be incorporated into lectures and lessons (even those not in a lab) and stunningly projected onto a large screen."In a little you can see a lot"

Contact email for web/handbook : www.cleapss.org.uk

PISA 2015: Good or bad news for UK science education? - S04

Thursday 5th January 2017

11:30 - 12:30

Location : HumSS, G27

Speakers

  1. Stanford University - Newman Burdett
  2. NFE - Dr Robert Sykes OBE, Thornden School
  3. Stella Paes, AQA

Come and join our expert panel that includes Jonathan Osborne, the chair of the PISA2015 committee. The panel will engage in a critical discussion around the OECD PISA 2015 outcomes. 'What are the implications for UK science education?'

Contact email for web/handbook : www.aqa.org.uk/science

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