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ASE FUN-da-MENTAL Science - University of Southampton

Saturday 27th September 2014

2014 sees the return of ASE FUNdaMENTAL Science event at the Mathematics and Science Learning Centre, University of Southampton. The theme of this year's event is the new national curriculum at primary and secondary, and we have two keynote speakers to bring their expertise.

Time: 08:45 - 13:30

Venue: Mathematics and Science Learning Centre, Southampton Education School, University of Southampton, Highfield Campus, University Road, Southampton, SO17 1BJ  View map and directions

Book online

Please note that this event has been rescheduled from the Saturday 29th March to Saturday 27th September. 

If you are registered for online services you can book online and pay by debit/credit card. If not register now

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If you would like to pay by cheque or request an invoice please download the booking form and email/post.

This event is ran in partnership with the Mathematics and Science Learning Centre (MSLC). To book a place or for any further enquiries please contact conferences@ase.org.uk or call 01707 266 532

 

Conference RatesFee
ASE Member £25
Non-member £40
Student member £10
Student non-member £15
Provisional Programme - 27 September 2014, 08:45 - 13:30

08:45-09:15 Registration and Exhibition

9:15-9:45 Keynote: Building a new Science Curriculum – the pleasures, perils and pitfalls: Ann Fullick

Ann Fullick is a science writer and educational consultant who has extensive knowledge of biology curricula and specifications in both the UK and across the world.  Ann works with the Biology Education Research Group (BERG) and is on the Education, Training and Policy Committee of the Society of Biology, and has an in depth knowledge of the development of new curriculum.

The opportunity to be involved in the development of a new Science Curriculum doesn’t come round very often. The journey from a blank sheet of paper to a finished document ready to support and underpin science education for the next few years has been long and arduous, although ultimately very rewarding. This session offers an insight into some of the best and worst of times along the way.

10:00-10:45 Session 2 options

Primary (2.1) Visualising progression from Year 1 to Year 6: Matthew Newberry, Cams Hill Science Consortium

Matthew supports teachers ‎and LSAs to develop a range of classroom resources such as Topic Overviews, Levels Mountains and ‎the Thinking Frames approach. This workshop will showcase the new curriculum ‎planning materials developed to meet and exceed the demands of the 2014 KS1 and KS2 science ‎curriculum and will give you an introduction to key requirements of the new 2014 National Curriculum for Science, new Yearly Planner posters covering the progression in vocabulary and key concepts from ‎Year 1 to Year 6 and Progress Pathways – which offer practical approaches to support assessment.‎

Primary (2.2) Dry Ice Workshop: Sue Martin‎, WOW Science

Dry ice is synonymous with just about every fictional science laboratory shown in the movies or on TV! Introducing it into lessons on solids, liquids and gases brings out some stimulating discussions on changing states of matter – but more than this, it’s great fun! In this workshop, get hands-on (safely of course!) with a wide range of exciting ideas and activities that you can use with your students in the classroom.

Secondary (2.3) TBA: Dave Whittle

Synopsis to follow

Secondary (2.4) From Sc1 to Working Scientifically – a workshop on inquiry: Chris Harrison

How different is working scientifically from what I already do? What changes will I need to make? How can I support pupils and colleagues in moving towards working scientifically? This workshop will use discussion and practical activities to help you to answer these (and other) questions. The session will be informed by ideas from the SAILS project (an EU FP7 project).

Secondary (2.5) The Astrodome:  University of Southampton

Southampton's mobile astrodome is one of the South's most advanced mobile planetariums, enabling groups of all ages to learn about astronomy in a fully immersive digital environment.

10:45-11:00 Coffee and Exhibition

11:00-11:45 Session 3 options

Primary (3.1) "Blob, the alien from outer space" - a Drama about the human senses: Caroline Galpin, Consultant

This short drama for the Early Years is followed by activities to consolidate the Science in an engaging way. It includes ideas on how to develop your own scientifically based dramas and to support KS2 pupils to write their own.

Primary (3.2) Talking Science ‎with primary children: Pauline Patterson, Formerly Primary science adviser Hampshire

Pauline will run a practical session to consider ways of developing children’s understanding through talk – meeting the aims of the new science NC which states:  “The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their scientific vocabulary and articulating scientific concepts clearly and precisely. They must be assisted in making their thinking clear.”

Secondary (3.3) Visualising progression from Year 6 to Year 9: Matthew Newberry

Matthew from the Cams Hill Science Consortium supports teachers ‎and LSAs to develop a range of classroom resources such as Topic Overviews, Levels Mountains and ‎the Thinking Frames approach. This workshop will showcase the new curriculum ‎planning materials developed to meet and exceed the demands of the 2014 KS2/KS3 science ‎curriculum and will give you an introduction to key requirements of the new 2014 National Curriculum for Science, new Yearly Planner posters covering the progression in vocabulary and key concepts from ‎Year 6 to Year 9 and Progress Pathways – which offer practical approaches to support assessment.‎

Secondary (3.4) Experiments from the cupboard: Lynne Rawlings

This session will show technicians (and anyone else), ideas on how to make equipment and use it in the lab, along with simple cheap demos all under £5 from items which are in the prep room. If you have any examples please bring!

Secondary (3.5) The Astrodome: University of Southampton (repeat)

Southampton's mobile astrodome is one of the South's most advanced mobile planetariums, enabling groups of all ages to learn about astronomy in a fully immersive digital environment.

12:00-12:45 Session 4 options

Primary (4.1) The Astrodome: University of Southampton

Southampton's mobile astrodome is one of the South's most advanced mobile planetariums, enabling groups of all ages to learn about astronomy in a fully immersive digital environment.

Primary (4.2) STEM Trails: Jeanette Morgan

Synopsis to follow

Secondary (4.3) Dynamite demos: Alan Glaze

A series of relatively simple practicals to inspire and challenge the scientist within. Full instructions included.

Secondary 4.4) LifeLab activities and the Tower of Risk! Hannah Davey and Lisa Bagust

Come along to find out about our innovative health literacy project, LifeLab.  Try out some LifeLab activities and the ‎Tower of Risk!‎

Secondary (4.5) Using the Raspberry Pi in Science:  Simon Fitzjohn

Not yet an ‘off the shelf’ instrument for class teaching but the Raspberry Pi is beginning to offer lots of potential to the science teacher. Focusing mainly on the KS3 and KS4 curriculum this workshop will showcase:  time lapse photography for dynamics experiments, infrared imaging, generating and analysing sounds and logging temperature changes.  The Raspberry Pi has the potential to introduce an element of programmed control to investigations which will excite students (and teachers!) and help address the new Computer Science curriculum. To include some hands on work and discussion to explore further possibilities.

13:00-13:30 Plenary: Looking to the new Science NC and its assessment: Dr Christine Harrison

A new curriculum provides good opportunity to review pedagogy and assessment and so allows teachers to build on their previous good practice and iron out the glitches that sometimes arise. This session will look at the legacy of the previous curriculum and its assessment and suggest how teachers might best prepare for the new one.

Christine Harrison worked in secondary schools for 13 years before joining King’s College, London to run the Biology Education section. Her teaching and research have centred on assessment, science education, cognitive acceleration and the use of text and TV in classrooms. Throughout all of these, she has maintained an interest in professional learning, in working collaboratively with teachers and in ensuring effective knowledge transfer. She is currently the Director of the Science PGCE.