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School Science Review

Editor: Geoff Auty

School Science Review (SSR) is a highly regarded periodical, sent to all 11-19 members of ASE on a quarterly basis. It is also sent to university libraries and education centres and is read worldwide. Contributions may be requested or unsolicited and come from a wide range of people with an interest in science education for ages 11-19, including teachers, academics and scientists.  All contributions are peer reviewed.

SSR is an important source for professional and curriculum development. Reading SSR is a form of ASE activism and members can communicate professional ideas by being either authors or readers. SSR aims to:

  • Inform readers of innovations and developments in science education
  • Develop readers’ knowledge of and practice in science education
  • Provide useful and innovative practical ideas for teaching science in secondary schools
  • Disseminate research and scholarship relevant to readers’ subject and pedagogic knowledge in and about science education

As well as major articles and Science Notes, SSR also contains comprehensive reviews of major published books and schemes, along with app and website reviews. There is an annual index (author, subject and title) published in every June issue.

Published: March / June / September / December
ISSN: 0036–6811 

Some SSR articles are open-access - this is indicated by the links that appear without the padlock icon. If you would like to access the full archive, join as a member online.

    School Science Review - 364School Science Review - 364

    March 2017 (Issue 364) This issue features lots of shared learning from educational contributors and ideas to try in our ‘science notes’ section including a 137-second plant hunt and two simple methods to enrich teaching on genetics. Other articles look at how to use test data to identify students’ misconceptions in science, how to help students to understand the different between physical and chemical changes with the ‘REACT’ (relating, experiencing, applying, cooperating and transferring) strategy and using papers cups to study heat transfer. This issue also presents the second and third instalment of a four part series on optimal learning in schools.

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