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Children take learning into their own hands in the Great Bug Hunt 2014

23 July 2014

Children take learning into their own hands in the Great Bug Hunt 2014

A teacher comments on how children in her class took learning into their own hands in an outside adventure to hunt bugs and are delighted to have been one of the prizewinning schools. Meghann Campbell, from Curry Rivel CoE Primary School (pictured right) comments, 

"We had a wonderful time investigating bugs in our school grounds, and the children were delighted with the incredible creatures they found! The project thoroughly engaged the children in their learning, and it enabled them to take real ownership, and direct their own learning. They asked their own questions, investigated and gathered their own information through first hand active involvement, they carried out their own research, and they made reasoned judgements based on their results. Such important key skills to learn and develop at this very young age. The children's natural enthusiasm and love of bugs is still very much alive as ever! Weeks down the line the children are still spending their whole playtimes, exploring the creatures living in our school grounds, it’s just wonderful! This project has really inspired them."

The competition is run every year by ASE’s learning resource site schoolscience.co.uk and takes science learning out of the classroom and brings it to life in the outdoors.  The prizewinning schools are:

  • 1st Prize - Chase Grammar School, Cannock
  • 2nd Prize - Curry Rivel CofE Primary School, Somerset
  • 3rd Prize - Westonbirt Prep School, Westonbirt

The winning entry was chosen by a team of judges, including celebrity wildlife expert and presenter, David Bellamy, and Luke Tilley from the Royal Entomological Society, on 28th June at Butterfly World, Hertfordshire. Children taking part in the competition had spent their time exploring habitats before recording their observations in photos, pictures and poems. 

The project thoroughly engaged the children in their learning, and it enabled them to take real ownership, and direct their own learning.

First prize of a ‘bug day’ in the school, to be led by Luke Tilley of the Royal Entomological Society, went to Year 5 at Chase Grammar School in Cannock, and their ‘hands-on with bugs’ day will take place in October. Photographs from and more information about this exciting prizewinning day, plus the winning entries from the BBSRC photography competition, will appear in the November issue of Education in Science. 

Second and third prizes went to Curry Rivel CofE Primary School, Somerset, and Westonbirt Prep School, Westonbirt, who walked away with a range of prizes from HEXBUG, a range of micro-robotic creatures. The bugs translucent shells expose electronics to the naked eye, a design element intended to get youngsters thinking about the science behind the robot.

For more information about this annual competition, please visit the competitions section on www.schoolscience.co.uk 

This year’s competition was supported by the Royal Entomological Society.