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Reflecting on teaching of the ‘appliance of science'

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Rachel Linfield reflects on memories of teaching of the ‘appliance of science’ over the past 30 years and what we remember.

Teaching science down on the farm

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Debbie Hicks explores the key role of the farm in teaching science as well as wider educational benefits and suggests activities to engage and excite.

Appliance of Science pull-out - Bubble Bonanza and a UK map of industrial museums

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Elsewhere in this issue of Primary Science (pages 22–23) Bert Nagel shows what you can do with bubbles. This special Appliance of Science pull-out looks at how bubble-based activities can be linked with areas of ‘working scientifically’ across the key stages. CIEC (the Centre for Industry Education Collaboration) has put together an activity that outlines exactly what you need to make the bubbles,

Bubbles made simple

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Bert Nagel explores how, using just drinking straws and staples, you can make wands that produce beautiful soap bubbles.

Pencil-free homework: worth considering?

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Colin Forster considers some alternative ways of setting homework.

Developing ‘argumentation’ with the 4–11 age range

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Terry Russell and Linda McGuigan of the University of Liverpool draw on their classroom research to offer their thoughts on argumen-tation, an aspect of ‘working scientifically’.

Eyes closed for learning

Issue: September 2016 144

Extract: Mick Statham explains how the simple, effective method of ‘eyes closed’ learning enhances how children’s scientific ideas form, change and strengthen.

Reviews

Issue: September 2016 144

Contents

Issue: May 2016 143

Focus on...

Issue: May 2016 143

Extract: One of the key questions in every science subject leader’s mind is ‘How do I engage the wider community in science at my school?’ There are many interpretations of this ‘wider community’. It could involve linking with parks and doing community gardening, supporting other schools by sharing ideas and expertise or leading cluster groups, or sharing science with parents by bringing them into school during lessons or running parent-and-child science clubs. All involve sharing the school’s beliefs about the principles of science.

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