Winners of the 2019 Great Bug Hunt announced

The winners of this year’s Great Bug Hunt competition have been announced! The competition, brought to you by the Association for Science Education and supported by the Royal Entomological Society, aims to take science learning out of the classroom and bring it to life outdoors. 

Pupils at participating schools are challenged to explore natural habitats and discover and record some of the fascinating insects they found. Their finds were explained by their teachers and shared with their friends through workbooks, posters and factsheets using graphs, photos, pictures and poems.

Hannah Russell, chief executive officer of the ASE, said: “I congratulate all of the schools that got involved in The Great Bug Hunt competition this year. It is a brilliant way of bringing science to life for children and shows that you can go on a journey of discovery in your own backyard.

"Using the natural environment when teaching is an important part of science education and something the ASE strongly advocates through its Outdoor Science Working Group.”

First prize of an “insect day” at the school goes to the Convent of Jesus and Mary Catholic Infant and Junior School in Willesden, London, who also won the Year One and Two category. In the years three and four category, the winning entry came from St Gregory’s Catholic Primary School in Chorley, while Coventry’s Templars Primary School won the years five and six category.

"Using the natural environment when teaching is an important part of science education and something the ASE strongly advocates through its Outdoor Science Working Group.”

Hannah Russell, ASE Chief Executive Officer

“Well done to all the children and teaching staff who entered the Great Bug Hunt competition this year, I really enjoyed judging the fabulous entries,” said Francisca Sconce of the RES. “Insects and other invertebrates provide an excellent route into the natural world, to investigate the diversity of life, how animals are adapted to their environment and the important roles they play in ecosystems.”

Celebrating her school’s achievement, The Convent of Jesus and Mary RC school’s Malgorzata Saiz said: “We were delighted to take part in this amazing project, which not only encourages outdoor learning and awareness of bugs in the local habitats, but also enables the children to use their scientific skills across the curriculum. The children were excited to venture into the hidden world of minibeasts around the school grounds.”

Details about the ASE 2020 Great Bug Hunt will appear in the pages of future issues of Education in Science, as well as on the ASE (www.ase.org.uk) and National Insect Week (www.nationalinsectweek.co.uk) websites.