Description

This article examines the characteristics of religions and the possible relationship between science and religion before going on to consider how science teachers might deal with creationism in their classrooms when teaching evolution. The central argument is that creationism is best seen not as a misconception but as a worldview. The most that a science teacher can normally aspire to is to ensure that students with creationist beliefs understand the scientific position. In the short term, the scientific worldview is unlikely to supplant a creationist one. We can help students to find their science lessons interesting and intellectually challenging, without them seeming threatening. Effective teaching in this area can not only help students learn about the theory of evolution, but to appreciate better the way science is done, the procedures by which scientific knowledge accumulates, the limitations of science and the ways in which scientific knowledge differs from other forms of knowledge.

Misconceptions
Creationism
Evolution

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