Description

This article provides an example of a teacher's learning, since the author only became aware of the microscale technique described very late in his professional career. The technique provides a convenient method of preparing and manipulating gases on a very small scale and a relatively safe means of demonstrating reactions that would be very hazardous on a larger scale. Safety issues are stressed but it is important that anyone attempting to follow the procedures checks these. If no suitable risk assessment appears to be available, CLEAPSS or SSERC should be consulted for further advice. Teachers also need to practise the various techniques and assure themselves of their competence to carry them out safely, minimising any danger to themselves or others.

More from this issue

Over the last few decades, smart materials have become increasingly important in the design of products. Essentially, a smart material is one that...

Jan 2011
Journal Article

Microscale chemistry has become accepted and introduced into teaching worldwide. It can be applied to all areas of chemistry and under most...

Jan 2011
Journal Article

This article discusses nanotechnology as a route to the production of new materials and provides a brief history of the evolution of this branch...

Jan 2011
Journal Article