Description

The rapid population growth of under-represented minority groups and the continued under-utilisation of women mean that future growth in the domestic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is linked to greater diversity. Subject-matter mastery is important but insufficient for a student to pursue a STEM profession behavioural factors also play a significant role. We describe some of these factors and their relation to career choice, and provide recommendations for practitioners utilising them in STEM education programmes and projects.

More from this issue

Two major sessions at the 2013 ASE Summer Celebration Conference in Hatfield offered teachers (and other educators) the chance to debate and...

Jan 2013
Journal Article

The following account is based on a selection of the questions that I have been asked over the past few years. I have changed the names of the...

Jan 2013
Journal Article

This article describes how a university and a museum have worked together to create a'How science works' workshop entitled'What...

Jan 2013
Journal Article