Description

The rapid population growth of under-represented minority groups and the continued under-utilisation of women mean that future growth in the domestic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is linked to greater diversity. Subject-matter mastery is important but insufficient for a student to pursue a STEM profession behavioural factors also play a significant role. We describe some of these factors and their relation to career choice, and provide recommendations for practitioners utilising them in STEM education programmes and projects.

More from this issue

In the UK, at key stage 4, students aged 14 15 studying GCSE Core Science or Unit 1 of the GCSE Biology course are required to be able to describe...

Jan 2013
Journal Article

CHEMopera is an opera blended with demonstrations of chemical reactions. It has been produced and performed twice by chemistry undergraduate...

Jan 2013
Journal Article

Examples of the use of various kinds of mobile information technology are explained for use in the classroom or laboratory. Individual or group...

Jan 2013
Journal Article