Left Right

In this activity children investigate whether there are more left-handed people in the population now than 100 years ago.

Description

Although left-handers currently form about 11 percent of the population, studies by scientists showed that only about 3 percent of those born in 1900 were left-handed. This evidence has been interpreted from a series of films made between 1897 and 1913. Researchers identified left-handed people from the arm they used to wave at the camera. 

In this activity children will investigate whether there are more left-handed people in the population now than 100 years ago. They will decide which actions to observe to determine whether a person is right or left-handed.  They will tally the number of left-handers in their sample and compare it to that of 3 in 100. 

Learning Objective: -    that people can be right-handed or left-handed

Children will demonstrate this by completing the task on page 2 successfully. 

-    that 'handedness' can be determined by observing actions 

Children will demonstrate this by completing the task on page 3 successfully. 

-    how the ratio of left to right-handed people compares to 100 years ago

Children will demonstrate this by completing the task on page 4 successfully. 

Primary upd8
Acknowledgements

These resources were initially developed in partnership with the Centre for Science Education, Sheffield Hallam University.