Description

This article considers the ways in which insulin is currently deployed as a teaching context and points to areas where the accuracy or completeness of current approaches are open to question. The scientific processes underpinning the development of successive insulins (animal, bio-engineered 'human' and bio-engineered analogue) are identified, and the key roles of the wider social, ethical and commercial contexts of the developments are described. The account indicates some ways in which this topical subject could be used to reinforce current specifications and enhance teaching about the processes of science.

history of science
Ethics

More from this issue

The discovery of the planet Neptune is presented as a case study for adding some useful history and philosophy of science to the science education...

Jan 2008
Journal Article

Derek Bell, Chief Executive of the Association for Science Education, was appointed professor of education in July 2007 by the College of Teachers...

Jan 2008
Journal Article

In September 2006 a new programme of study for science at key stage 4 (ages 14-16) came into effect in England and Wales. This September sees the...

Jan 2008
Journal Article