Description

It is commonly accepted that practical work is an essential part of studying science. It is universally accepted that it can help to develop both conceptual and procedural knowledge, as well as providing active learning experiences to develop robust knowledge. Practical work can also contribute to original thinking and/or develop students' conceptions and previous knowledge. This article examines how the different facets of practical work can be supported and enhanced by the effective use of information and communication technology (ICT), with specific reference to how disabled students can gain greater access to the activities and the science behind them.

Practical Work
SEND
ICT

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