Snorers - what's all that noise?

In this activity children learn how sounds are made and the difference between speaking and snoring and which parts of the body are responsible.

Description

Scientists in the US have found that found children whose parents snore are three times as likely to do so too.  Experts in the UK said it was more likely to be due to families being overweight, as obesity is linked to half of all snoring. Snoring means that less oxygen is being breathed in when asleep so snorers find it difficult to concentrate the next day.  Scientists have found that children who are bad snorers are more likely to get bad marks at school. 

Children learn about how sounds are made. They learn the difference between speaking and snoring and which parts of the body are responsible. They create a simple poster as a visual aid for a 90 second presentation. The presentation is given to a nuisance snorer explaining what causes snoring and about the consequent ill effects.

Learning Objective:

-    That sounds are made when objects or materials vibrate.

Children will learn

-    To explain an application of sound using scientific knowledge and understanding.

-    That vibrations from sound sources travel through different materials to the ear.

 

Primary upd8
Acknowledgements

These resources were initially developed in partnership with the Centre for Science Education, Sheffield Hallam University.