Description

The theory of evolution, as well-established as any in the history of science, is of vast daily practical use. Challenged since its development, the theory of evolution always emerges stronger and with more explanatory power. Without some understanding of evolution, key stage 3 pupils (11-14 year-olds) cannot properly appreciate the biological world in all its diversity and fascination. Yet the National Curriculum for England addresses only isolated aspects of evolution, and in a way likely to cause conceptual problems and misconceptions. By slavishly adhering to the National Curriculum and QCA scheme of work, publishers are producing materials which are often incoherent and inaccurate, and more likely to confuse than educate.

Misconceptions
Teaching Evolution

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